Posts Tagged ‘thriller’

Special Guest – Alison Morton

AURELIA_cover_image800x520Today I welcome back fellow writer Alison Morton to my blog. She’s the author of the Roma Nova alternate history thriller series, and she’s just published the fourth instalment, AURELIA. I loved the first three books, which featured Carina Mitela, American-born but with a Roma Novan mother. They followed her story as she returns to her mother’s homeland where she has to adjust to living in a matriarchal society where women rule and her family is one of the top twelve in the country (something that brings both duties and privileges).

AURELIA takes us back two generations, to 1960, and is the story of Carina’s grandmother. It’s a cracking good read! I really like Aurelia, who is a fantastic heroine – courageous, strong, intelligent and decisive – and this fast-paced novel, which takes us on a journey through an alternative Europe, keeps the reader turning the pages throughout. And the villain of the piece is truly evil!

So, Alison, tell us what made you want to go back and tell Aurelia’s story?
Two things, really. Firstly, we meet Aurelia as an older woman in INCEPTIO, PERFIDITAS and SUCCESSIO and as I wrote her I found myself becoming fascinated by her common sense, toughness and her loneliness. In INCEPTIO, Karen struggles to visualise Aurelia twenty plus years before as a military commander leading a unit to retake a war-torn city. And the mystery of Aurelia’s single life – there is no husband, lover or companion in the family circle or memory, yet she is Karen’s grandmother. Plenty to chew on there. Secondly, I wanted to write about the terrible events twenty-three years before INCEPTIO that scarred Conrad and threatened the destruction of Roma Nova itself. AURELIA is the pre-cursor to that story. Watch this space!

Woman soldierShe’s definitely what I would call a “kick-ass” heroine – is that something you aspired to be yourself? (I know you were in the army)
Well, all fiction is made up, but some of it is less made up than other parts of it. 🙂

As I said, the bad guy is truly evil, almost like a Bond-villain – is that what you based him on or did you have something/someone else in mind?
No, I didn’t base him on a Bond-villain. 😉 The bad guy in AURELIA has all the gifts the world could give him, but wants more. This fascinates me. In a way, our modern culture centres on that. But he is beauty and intelligence with a rotten heart and represents our darker side. So I constructed him from those ideas. Of course, there may just have been the odd hint about him in the first three books …

Berlin

Berlin

I found your alternative Europe absolutely fascinating and especially the idea that if Germany/ Austria had reverted to tiny kingdoms/ princedoms/ mini republics after the Great War, they would never have had the energy to band together and cause a second one because they were always squabbling among themselves. Do you think that’s what should have happened after the real World War I?
Well, maybe I’m a romantic, or possibly a touch Machiavellian, but I think it’s a strong possibility. ‘German-ness’ has never been confined to national borders; for instance, Prague and Strasbourg were very much culturally and philosophically identified German cities for centuries. In contrast, German-speaking regions vary massively from each other in dialect, loyalty, food & drink, national costume, politics and identity from northern Italy to Hamburg, Alsace to Berlin.

You obviously do your research very thoroughly and there was a lot of information about silver trading, stock markets, banking and espionage – how did you go about finding all those details? (And I just want to add that you did a brilliant job in explaining it to the reader).
After hours, weeks, even months of research plus delving back into my own past. I worked in the City of London for a few years, and although not in metal trading or futures, I couldn’t help but be aware of them. Ditto the banking. And doesn’t silver fascinate everybody …?

Rome

Rome

The ending of the book isn’t exactly a cliff-hanger (I think I can safely say that without giving anything away?), but at the same time I was left wanting to know more about what happens next. Will you continue Aurelia’s story or are you moving on to her daughter Marina next?
I like to resolve each of my stories properly; I’m not a fan of leaving readers on a cliff-hanger as I think it’s unfair to them. You may think that things seem settled for the moment, but if you look up a Roma Nova history book, you’ll see that there’s a catastrophe looming. Oh, are all the history books out on loan? What a shame! You’ll have to wait until the next Roma Nova story to see what happens thirteen years later …

Ohh, intriguing!  Best of luck and thank you for being my guest today!

There’s a lovely book trailer for AURELIA here:-

https://youtu.be/K5_hXzg0JWA

Alison Morton_smLinks:-

Connect with Alison on her Roma Nova blog: http://alison-morton.com/blog/

Facebook author page https://www.facebook.com/AlisonMortonAuthor

Twitter https://twitter.com/alison_morton @alison-morton

Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5783095.Alison_Morton

Buying link (multiple retailers/formats):

AURELIA: http://alison-morton.com/books-2/aurelia/where-to-buy-aurelia/